Category Archives: PowerShell

Top 10 Blog posts of 2017

Happy New Year!

In 2017 the OxfordSBSGuy.com blog has gone from strength to strength, with 26 posts and 863,000 views. In 2017 I implemented SSL and been working on some tweaks here and there to improve performance.  This year I’m considering a redesign and new hosting is in the pipeline to improve performance further. Thank you for your support.

Below are the top ten articles in 2017

  1. PowerShell: Get-ADComputer to retrieve computer last logon date – part 1 (103,582 views)
  2. PowerShell: Get-ADUser to retrieve password last set and expiry information (83,394 views)
  3. Exchange PowerShell: How to list all SMTP email addresses in Exchange (63,442 views)
  4. How to convert a Hyper-V VHDX to VMDK for VMware Workstation (31,337 views)
  5. PowerShell: Get-ADUser to retrieve login scripts and home directories – Part 1 (31,017 views)
  6. How to install Exchange 2010 (SP3) on Windows Server 2012   (43,232 views)
  7. Server 2012: “Your current security settings do not allow this file to be downloaded” (29,374 views)
  8. Exchange PowerShell: How to enumerate Distribution Lists, managers and members (24,264 views)
  9. Dell PERC: How to clear the foreign configuration on a HDD using the Raid Configuration Utility (21,799 views)
  10. How to resolve VMware Workstation “The network bridge on device ‘VMnet0’ is not running” (21,737 views)

Looking forward to 2018, the industry recently has been focusing on security so I’ll be brushing up on some Security Skills with Sophos and WatchGuard, and with more and more clients moving to Office 365, I intend to write a few more PowerShell scripting to help manage end users and computers in the cloud.

I hope you have a great year!
Carl
www.OxfordSBSGuy.com

PowerShell: How to use Get-ADUser to list all recently created accounts (and recently changed accounts)

PowerShell

For the next couple of posts I’ll be looking into AD security and auditing. In this article we’ll look at how to use Get-ADUser to list all recently created accounts.

With the increasing number of cyber attacks, security is at the top of most IT departments agenda. There are many checks you can perform to make sure AD is safe and secure, and that only valid or approved modifications have been made to user accounts. I’ll look at AD auditing in a future post, but this will be a handy snippet of PowerShell to help you identify recently created AD accounts, and a bonus bit of code to identify recently modified accounts!

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PowerShell: Get-ADUser to retrieve disabled user accounts

PowerShell

I’ve written about Get-ADUser several times before because it is a pretty essential cmdlet for any Active Directory administrator, but I haven’t written about it in a while.

Recently I had a need to list all disabled accounts in a domain, so here is how to do it using Get-ADUser.

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Office 365 PowerShell: How to bulk change Office 365 calendar permissions using Windows PowerShell

office365 powershell

I recently had to make some bulk changes to calendar permissions in Office 365, the client wanted the Default user permission to be set to Reviewer rather than AvailabilityOnly. So in this post I’ll walk you through how I went about making bulk permission changes to the Default user for the calendar folder for all users in Office 365.

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PowerShell: How to check for drives with less than 10GB of free diskspace

PowerShell

I’ve been working on a simple PowerShell command today to import into our endpoint management solution so we can alert on disks with low diskspace. It’s been a while since I’ve dabbled with PowerShell, and it reminded me just how flexible it is and much I love it!

So I thought I would walk you through the evolution of the command I ended up with.

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Office365 PowerShell: How to the find out mailbox sizes in Office365 (and Exchange 2016) using PowerShell

office365 powershell

In this post I’ll look at how to find out the mailbox sizes in Office365 using PowerShell.

I’m working with a few more companies now who use Office365 so I thought I would look at how to perform a few general Exchange administration tasks in Office365 using PowerShell so that I can manage and maintain them more easily.

Note: the steps below also work for Exchange 2016.

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